00002 - Huge Rooted Sharp 3.98 Inch Large Carcharodontosaurus Dinosaur Tooth
00002 - Huge Rooted Sharp 3.98 Inch Large Carcharodontosaurus Dinosaur Tooth 00002 - Huge Rooted Sharp 3.98 Inch Large Carcharodontosaurus Dinosaur Tooth 00002 - Huge Rooted Sharp 3.98 Inch Large Carcharodontosaurus Dinosaur Tooth 00002 - Huge Rooted Sharp 3.98 Inch Large Carcharodontosaurus Dinosaur Tooth 00002 - Huge Rooted Sharp 3.98 Inch Large Carcharodontosaurus Dinosaur Tooth 00002 - Huge Rooted Sharp 3.98 Inch Large Carcharodontosaurus Dinosaur Tooth 00002 - Huge Rooted Sharp 3.98 Inch Large Carcharodontosaurus Dinosaur Tooth 00002 - Huge Rooted Sharp 3.98 Inch Large Carcharodontosaurus Dinosaur Tooth

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00002 - Huge Rooted Sharp 3.98 Inch Large Carcharodontosaurus Dinosaur Tooth

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Species
Carcharodontosaurus saharicus, Depéret and Savornin 1925
Age
Upper Cretaceous, Cenomanian stage, (~96 Million Years)
Location
Taouz, Kem Kem Basin, South Morocco
Formation
Tegana Formation, Yellow Sandstone Beds
Size
120 mm   •    in
Weight
47 g   •    oz
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Description

This tooth belongs to the great carnivorous theropod, the Carcharodontosaurus. It has an extraordinary size, more than 4 inches of length. Without doubt, it must have belonged to a very adult and completely developed individual. Nowadays it is not easy to find teeth of this size, after many years of excavation in these sites. This type of piece is increasingly rare. This tooth has a series of restored fractures, using the filling method. The restorations have been performed along thin fractures in the enamel, on the tip (which was completely fractured and was glued again) and in a sector where the root meets the enamel. The root is partially preserved.

This restoration method used by local miners consists in the colmatage of the fractures with a mix of glued sand of the same stratigraphic level where the fossil has been excavated.
Along the edge, the characteristics of the lateral serrations can be seen.

The teeth with strong and vivid fossilization colors such as red, orange and black come from small paleochannels composed by thin layers, in the intermediate and upper stratigraphic levels (Red Sandstone Beds), from the Aoufous Formation (Kem Kem Basin, South of Morocco). The lithology of this body of sediment is characterized by the dominance of sandstones (also known as arenites) and fluvial gravel, of siliceous nature. Sometimes large concentrations of iron oxide are present, and then a small sample of that is usually present at the base of the tooth. These mineralizations are responsible for the wide range of beautiful reddish color tones, slowly drawn during millions of years via fossil-diagenetic processes.

The complicated sedimentarian architecture of the layers where most large vertebrates are found makes the excavation methodology a real challenge. Sometimes the local miners have to excavate long tunnels that follow the distribution of the fossiliferous layer.

Carcharodontosaurus is a genus of carnivorous carcharodontosaurid dinosaurs that existed between 100 and 94 million years ago, during the Cenomanian stages of the mid-Cretaceous Period. It is currently known to include two species, C.saharicus and C.iguidensis, which were among the larger theropods, as large as or slightly bigger than Tyrannosaurus and possibly slightly larger than Giganotosaurus, but not quite as large as Spinosaurus.

The genus Carcharodontosaurus is named after the shark genus Carcharodon (itself named from the Greekκαρχαρο(karcharo) meaning "jagged" or "sharp" andοδοντο(odonto) meaning "teeth")), andσαυρος(sauros), meaning "lizard".

Carcharodontosaurus includes some of the longest and heaviest known carnivorous dinosaurs, with various scientists proposing length estimates for the species C. saharicus ranging between 12 and 13.3 m (39 and 44 ft) and weight estimates between 6.2 and 15.1metric tons.

Carcharodontosaurus were carnivores, with enormous jaws and long, serrated teeth up to eight inches long A skull length of about 1.6 meters (5.2 ft) has been restored for C. saharicus, and the skull of C. iguidensis is reported to have been about the same size. Currently, the largest known theropod skull belongs to another huge carcharodontosaurid dinosaur, the closely related Giganotosaurus (with skull length estimates up to 1.95 m) (6.4 ft). Gregory S. Paul estimates Carcharodontosaurus iguidensis at 10 m (33 ft) and 4 t (4.4 short tons). [This last paragraph is from Wikipedia - License: Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported]

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